RapidMade CEO Renee Eaton

RapidMade CEO Renee Eaton

Kudos to Oregon Business Magazine for its feature, Women’s Work, which details the chronic gender gap that continues in manufacturing. The article is based on interviews with female professionals in trade organizations, manufacturing firms, and higher education.

Together they show how improving gender representation requires a concerted approach from across the industry to reshape an institutionalized culture of gender-based segregation and redefine archaic norms of what work women can and cannot do.

Strategies proposed include:

  • Advising businesses that diversity will ease the labor shortage and improve the bottom line.

  • Promoting manufacturing careers to female students and professionals.

  • Providing supportive networks, like Women in Manufacturing and Oregon Tradeswomen, to help women secure employment and businesses find and retain female employees.

  • Breaking down the “bro culture” prevalent in manufacturing.

RapidMade CEO Renee Eaton, a Women in Manufacturing chair of its Oregon chapter was among the women featured in the article. RapidMade is a Portland-based additive manufacturing (3D printing) and engineering services firm.

CAD files have a myriad of formats and corresponding file extensions (example: filename.extension.) With all those formats out there, what is best for you to use? CAD files for 3D printing generally fall into two categories: parametric files (equation driven files that are fully defined - i.e. a circle is actually a circle) and mesh files (made of points and triangles - i.e. a circle is thousands of tiny triangles.)  Here's a great guideline. to help you get started.

Congratulations to Innovarai and Madorra Medical who are among Portland Business Journal's 2017 Small Business & Innovation awardees!  Their achievements will be recognized and their products showcased on November 1st from 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. at the Portland Hilton Hotel.

Rapid prototyping and low-volume production, made possible through 3D printing (additive manufacturing), are lowering the barriers to entry for entrepreneurs and start ups.  These advanced manufacturing technologies lower costs, reduce lead times, and optimize designs, making product launches more affordable and timely.

Growing up in Pittsburgh, if you weren't directly connected to the Steel industry, you complained about the rotten egg smell and pollution.  But when the industrial giants went silent in the 70s and 80s, the complaints shifted dramatically to the economic tragedy that was unfolding - the flight of life-long residents and well-paying jobs.   Rhetoric from the recent election aside, Pittsburgh's manufacturing base is both alive and well...

The Pittsburgh Regional Alliance (PRA) recently reported that in 2016 the manufacturing sector accounted for the most investment dollars ($6.1 billion), the most deals (50 companies expanding or relocating), and the most new and retained jobs (3,667).

But as we've continued to see, the type and number of jobs that have been created don't resemble those of the steel-era in any way.

“Manufacturing is the most active sector in southwestern Pennsylvania,” explains PRA President David Ruppersberger. “But as technology and automation continue to transform this legacy sector, the reality is that manufacturing facilities will be smaller-footprint, high-efficiency environments where fewer workers, with advanced skills including STEM proficiency, will produce more goods. This is a trend that won’t reverse at any time in the foreseeable future.”

Hearing of Pittsburgh's adoption of additive manufacturing and other advanced technologies is encouraging if the resulting economic turnaround benefits the greater community.

 

Come join us for a unique way to celebrate St. Patrick's Day, next Friday, March 17...

Lunch Meeting
  
The Current and Future State of Advanced and Additive Manufacturing

Advanced and Additive Manufacturing (AM) has seen an explosion in investment, growth, and development in the last decade. For metals alone, AM means a shift from mold-based component concepts and the constraints that go with them to rapid iteration, development of ideas with full geometric freedom. Advantages include faster processing times, lower-cost components, and a level of design freedom that is so far unheard of. The main forces behind this momentum include the automotive, medical technology, and aerospace industries. Come hear a short presentation on the current and future state of this amazing technology. 

Our Speaker: 
Kristofer Beem- Business Development Director. Kristofer has a degree in Entrepreneurial Business and is one of the first four members of RapidMade, Inc. He has a combination of ten years of sales and marketing experience in B2B and B2C environments. His working knowledge of 3D printing and additive technologies enable him to quickly work with clients in a collaborative manner. In the past five years, he has built a strong client base of almost 400, including several Fortune 500 clients, and globally renowned brands. 
 
What: The Current and Future State of Advanced and Additive Manufacturing When: Friday March 17th, 2017 11:30 – Doors open, Lunch – order from Sidebar menu 12:00 – 1:00 Presentation

Where: Sidebar – 3901 N. Williams Ave  

Cost:  Free entrance, order lunch off Sidebar menu RSVP: Space is limited. 

Posted
AuthorRenee Eaton

Before starting RapidMade, Renee Eaton worked in higher education teaching management classes and career counseling at Oregon universities for almost a decade.  While she loves the world of 3D printing, engineering, product design and additive manufacturing, she sometimes misses working with college students.

Last week, she had an opportunity to return to the classroom.  Each year, at her youngest daughter's school, St. Mary's College of Maryland, Renee presents an Interviewing Skills Workshop to its Senior class.  In addition to giving back to the community, Renee gets  to practice her own interviewing skills - which she put to good use this past year.  An added bonus was the event's timing which coincided with the horrendous Portland snow and ice storms.  She's calling it Karma.

 

 

Our friends at Direct Dimensions in Owings Mills, Maryland, will be "creating a 3D CAD model" of the Roberto Clemente Bridge in our hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  The resulting files will then be used to create 3D prints of the bridge for an upcoming RAPID + TCT show being held in Pittsburgh in May.

Pittsburgh, long recognized for its sports accomplishments, is becoming well known as a Center of Excellence in Additive Manufacturing as well.



 

On Thursday, October 20, the University of Portland will be hosting its Operations & Tech Management Symposium from 4 - 7 PM in Shiley Atrium.

Join us for thought-provoking discussion led by industry leaders followed by networking reception. Meet the speakers and connect with movers and shakers in the operations and technology management field.
Don’t miss this inaugural event!

  • KEYNOTE SPEAKER – Fred Pond, former CIO Columbia Sportswear
  • PANELISTS –
    Chris DeGallier, CGD Owner; Greg Martin, Knowledge Universe CIO; Jimmy Godard, Bank of America VP Senior Change; Renee Eaton, Rapidmade CEO; Rick McClain, Milwaukee Electronics COO, Derek Weiss, VP, Deputy CIO Cambia Health Solutions and Wilson Zorn, Adidas Sr. Enterprise Architect.

Agenda:

  • Registration/Welcome
  • Keynote Speaker – Fred Pond, CIO Columbia Sportswear
  • Guest Speaker – Jackie Baretta, CIO Willamette University
  • Panel Discussion Moderated by: Lisa McCaffrey (see “Speakers” for panel bios)
  • Networking Reception

Event Details:

  • When: Thursday, October 20th 2016, 4-7PM
  • Where:  University of Portland – Shiley Hall (Atrium)
  • Parking: FREE (main campus parking lot)
  • General Admission: $35 (includes “Primal Teams” book by Jackie Baretta, reception appetizers and drink)
  • Student Admission: $15 (includes “Primal Teams” book by Jackie Baretta, reception appetizers and drink)